Difference between revisions of "DAVID M. LUMSDEN, LT, USN"

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''Severna Park pilot dies in Navy jet crash'''
''Severna Park pilot dies in Navy jet crash'''


A Navy pilot from Severna Park was killed Wednesday when his jet crashed during night landing practice near the Puget Sound, Wash. Lt David M. Lumsden, 27, was piloting a Grumman Intruder jet for the first time in a new squadron stationed at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station when the accident occurred. A second officer, Cmdr. Sheldon Hurbitz is missing following the crash, and is presumed dead. According to a Navy officer, Lumsden had just joined the VA-95 squadron on Wednesday after having been retrained to pilot the Grumman jet at a training squadron on the base. On Wednesday night be borrowed some flight gear and began practicing landings with Cmdr. Hurbitz.
A Navy pilot from Severna Park was killed Wednesday when his jet crashed during night landing practice near the Puget Sound, Wash.  
 
Lt David M. Lumsden, 27, was piloting a Grumman Intruder jet for the first time in a new squadron stationed at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station when the accident occurred. A second officer, Cmdr. Sheldon Hurbitz is missing following the crash, and is presumed dead.  
 
According to a Navy officer, Lumsden had just joined the VA-95 squadron on Wednesday after having been retrained to pilot the Grumman jet at a training squadron on the base. On Wednesday night be borrowed some flight gear and began practicing landings with Cmdr. Hurbitz.
 
The exercise was designed to catch the planes on landing. Witnesses saw Lumsden’s jet make a 45-degree roll and fall upside down into shallow water off Puget Sound, the officers said.
 
According to the officer, the accident occurred “in about five seconds – it was too fast to even think about getting out.”
 
David was the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Lumsden of Severn Park.
 
He was a 1969 graduate of the Naval Academy, and from there was stationed aboard a destroyer serving off Vietnam for a year.
 
After returning to the U.S., Lumsden enrolled in flight training and received his wings in 1971. He was assigned to a Navy base in Glynco, Georgia, where he received his master’s degree from the University of Georgia.
 
Lumsden was transferred to Washington State last year for training in the jet, and was assigned to the squadron due to be deployed on an aircraft carrier next week.
 
According to his father, David was “very happy” flying and was looking forward to the assignment at sea.
 
In addition to his parents, he is survived by brother Stephen Lumsden, 16 at home, and grandparents Mr. and Mrs. William Barnes, in South Harpswell, Maine.
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(There is more to the story, but the optical character recognition breaks down quickly.)


He [https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/124594972 is buried in] Arlington National Cemetery.
He [https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/124594972 is buried in] Arlington National Cemetery.

Latest revision as of 22:08, 8 October 2020

David Lumsden '69

Date of birth: September 12, 1947

Date of death: November 20, 1974

Age: 27

Lucky Bag

From the 1969 Lucky Bag:

1969 Lumsden LB.jpg

DAVID MICHAEL LUMSDEN

San Francisco, California

A Navy Junior, Dave hails from just about everywhere but calls San Francisco his home. Dave came straight from Encinal High in Alameda, eager to make his mark at the Academy. Not one for numbers, Dave was a management minor in the truest sense of the word. Far more active outside the academic departments, he attended Jump school and became a qualified Scuba instructor. He was just as active in sports, trying his hand at everything from varsity sailing to company handball. His willingness to help, to work, and above all to have a good time will add materially to Dave's future success as an officer.

1969 Lumsden LB.jpg

DAVID MICHAEL LUMSDEN

San Francisco, California

A Navy Junior, Dave hails from just about everywhere but calls San Francisco his home. Dave came straight from Encinal High in Alameda, eager to make his mark at the Academy. Not one for numbers, Dave was a management minor in the truest sense of the word. Far more active outside the academic departments, he attended Jump school and became a qualified Scuba instructor. He was just as active in sports, trying his hand at everything from varsity sailing to company handball. His willingness to help, to work, and above all to have a good time will add materially to Dave's future success as an officer.

Shipmate

From the March 1975 issue of Shipmate:

Lt. David Michael Lumsden, USN, died 20 November in the crash of his A-6 jet during night landing practice off Whidbey Island, Washington. Funeral services were held at the Naval Academy Chapel. Interment was in Arlington National Cemetery.

Lt. Lumsden was a graduate of Encinal High in Alameda, California. Following graduation from the Naval Academy in 1969, he served in the USS Eversole off Vietnam. After returning to the United States, Lt. Lumsden enrolled in flight training and received his wings in 1971 at Pensacola. He was then assigned to Glynco, Georgia. While there, he received his MA in Business Administration from the University of Georgia. He was transferred to VA95, stationed at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station, last June.

He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Lumsden, 809 Stonehouse Drive, Berrywood, Severna Park MD 21146; and a brother, Stephen.

Contributions may be made to the USNA Chapel Memorial Fund in Lt Lumsden's name.

In the Class of 1969 column:

I must sadly report the loss of a classmate. Lt Dave Lumsden USN was killed 20 November while engaged in FCLP at NAS Whidbey Island. Recently reporting aboard VA-95, Dave had just completed A-6 training with VA-128. Dave and I shared many Aero notes as mids and I know the Navy has suffered by his loss. Malcolm Fortson and Rick Kirkland served as honorary pallbearers at burial services in Arlington. The entire class extends its sympathy to Dave's parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Lumsden of Severna Park, MD.

Loss

From The Capital (Annapolis) on November 22, 1974:

Severna Park pilot dies in Navy jet crash'

A Navy pilot from Severna Park was killed Wednesday when his jet crashed during night landing practice near the Puget Sound, Wash.

Lt David M. Lumsden, 27, was piloting a Grumman Intruder jet for the first time in a new squadron stationed at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station when the accident occurred. A second officer, Cmdr. Sheldon Hurbitz is missing following the crash, and is presumed dead.

According to a Navy officer, Lumsden had just joined the VA-95 squadron on Wednesday after having been retrained to pilot the Grumman jet at a training squadron on the base. On Wednesday night be borrowed some flight gear and began practicing landings with Cmdr. Hurbitz.

The exercise was designed to catch the planes on landing. Witnesses saw Lumsden’s jet make a 45-degree roll and fall upside down into shallow water off Puget Sound, the officers said.

According to the officer, the accident occurred “in about five seconds – it was too fast to even think about getting out.”

David was the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Lumsden of Severn Park.

He was a 1969 graduate of the Naval Academy, and from there was stationed aboard a destroyer serving off Vietnam for a year.

After returning to the U.S., Lumsden enrolled in flight training and received his wings in 1971. He was assigned to a Navy base in Glynco, Georgia, where he received his master’s degree from the University of Georgia.

Lumsden was transferred to Washington State last year for training in the jet, and was assigned to the squadron due to be deployed on an aircraft carrier next week.

According to his father, David was “very happy” flying and was looking forward to the assignment at sea.

In addition to his parents, he is survived by brother Stephen Lumsden, 16 at home, and grandparents Mr. and Mrs. William Barnes, in South Harpswell, Maine.

He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Class of 1969

David is one of 17 members of the Class of 1969 on Virtual Memorial Hall.

The "category" links below lead to lists of related Honorees; use them to explore further the service and sacrifice of alumni in Memorial Hall.