Difference between revisions of "JOHN P. HOGAN, LCDR, USN"

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{{LuckyBag|LBLink=https://archive.org/details/luckybag1968unse|class=1968
{{LuckyBag|LBLink=https://archive.org/details/luckybag1968unse|class=1968
|picture=1968 Hogan LB.jpg
|picture=1968 Hogan LB.jpg
|LBName=JOHN PATRICK HOGAN  
|LBName=JOHN PATRICK HOGAN
|LBHometown=Davenport, Iowa
|LBText=Jack, like most of us, came to the Academy a civilian at heart. Coming directly from Davenport, Iowa, he had a year at St. Ambrose College under his belt along with a spare tire which was a result of that highly cherished year. He adjusted well to his second freshman year here, due greatly to his easy-going likable personality.
|LBText=Jack, like most of us, came to the Academy a civilian at heart. Coming directly from Davenport, Iowa, he had a year at St. Ambrose College under his belt along with a spare tire which was a result of that highly cherished year. He adjusted well to his second freshman year here, due greatly to his easy-going likable personality.
<br /><br />
</p><p>
His four years on the Severn brought many laughs to all who crossed his path, and many ideas to modernize the "Marble Monastery", most of which never got out of his room. He had a standing feud with the technical aspects of the curriculum, and though it did score a few knockdowns, it never gained a decision. Besides working hard to beef up his QPR, "Hoagie" was an intramural stalwart who hated to lose, as evidenced by his hard-hitting heavy weight football career.
His four years on the Severn brought many laughs to all who crossed his path, and many ideas to modernize the "Marble Monastery", most of which never got out of his room. He had a standing feud with the technical aspects of the curriculum, and though it did score a few knockdowns, it never gained a decision. Besides working hard to beef up his QPR, "Hoagie" was an intramural stalwart who hated to lose, as evidenced by his hard-hitting heavy weight football career.
<br /><br />
</p><p>
Jack looks with great anticipation and relief to graduation, after which Navy air will occupy his time. He is sure to brighten many more lives as he has brightened ours on many occasions.}}
Jack looks with great anticipation and relief to graduation, after which Navy air will occupy his time. He is sure to brighten many more lives as he has brightened ours on many occasions.}}


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Duncan said the craft took off Sunday morning from Norfolk Naval Air Station en route to Brunswick Naval Air Station in Maine.
Duncan said the craft took off Sunday morning from Norfolk Naval Air Station en route to Brunswick Naval Air Station in Maine.


The dead, all Navy personnel living in the Norfolk area were Lt. Cmdr. Lynwood H. Duncan, 34, originally of Greensboro, N.C.; Lt. Cmdr. James P. Hogan, 34, of Davenport, Iowa; Lt. Paul Melotte, 31, of Funkstown, Md; Petty Officer Second Class Michael J. Kennedy, 25, of Warminster, Pa., and Airman Apprentice Paul J. Dellas, 21, of San Jose, Calif.
The dead, all Navy personnel living in the Norfolk area were Lt. Cmdr. Lynwood H. Duncan, 34, originally of Greensboro, N.C.; Lt. Cmdr. James P. Hogan, 34, of Davenport, Iowa; Lt. Paul Melotte, 31, of Funkstown, Md.; Petty Officer Second Class Michael J. Kennedy, 25, of Warminster, Pa., and Airman Apprentice Paul J. Dellas, 21, of San Jose, Calif.


The Navy H2 helicopter went down in a field near a sparsely populated residential area in the northern part of this community of about 12,000 south of Manchester.
The Navy H2 helicopter went down in a field near a sparsely populated residential area in the northern part of this community of about 12,000 south of Manchester.
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Note mis-identification of Jack as "James" in the article; believe this is a simple mistake.
Note mis-identification of Jack as "James" in the article; believe this is a simple mistake.
== Other Information ==
From researcher Kathy Franz:
<blockquote>
John, who also went by Jack, was a 1963 graduate of Assumption High School. Monogram Club, football, wrestling. In 1962 he was a starting guard, weighing 145 lbs. As a junior, he helped renovate the third floor of the Cosgrove Building including scrubbing layers of black dirt from the vast ceiling.
He once got a D in physical education. His father wondered how an athlete could get such a mark, so he wrote Jack. Jack's reply: "Dad, in physical education they have to grade from the top to the bottom. I just happened to be picked for a D."
After high school, he played in a billiards league at the Cue and Cushion with students from Assumption High School.
John married Patricia Jo McGivern on June 15, 1968. She also graduated from Assumption High School. Men serving in the honor guard were: Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Timothy Wilson, Ens. Michael T. Gaul, Fred L. Muniz, Lewis M. Barasha, S. Patrick Marvel, Michael Danesi, Charles Bambeneck, and Theodore Naydan. John's brother Michael was an usher.
John made his first solo flight in a T-34 Mentor trainer in December 1968. He completed five months of intensive academic, military, and physical training, including one month of primary flight training with Training Squadron One at Saufley Field.
In May 1971, John received the Bronze Star for action in Vietnam. He was assigned to a helicopter combat support squadron and engaged in the resupply by air of the 7th Fleet. He also received the Distinguished Flying Cross and several other awards.
Services for John were held on May 26, 1979, at Holy Family Catholic Church, Davenport. He was survived by his wife Patricia Jo, daughter Shannon, son Kevin; parents Mr. and Mrs. John Hogan; sisters Patricia, Cathy, Colleen; and a brother Michael.
His father earned the nickname "One Round" Jack. From the Quad-City Times, March 5, 1968: "It seems that when he aspired to be a Golden Gloves boxer, he met a tough kid who taught him a lesson – keep that chin tucked in. The opponent realized in a hurry that Jack had not read the book very well. He had the hook baited. After Jack had sparred a bit, he dropped his guard. The chin was sticking out there like a lantern. A swish, a punch to the jaw, and down went Hogan. Somebody has quoted him as saying that "the end of that 10 count was the sweetest music I ever heard." P.S. Jack did not resume his boxing career."
</blockquote>
He [https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/191342241 has a marker in] Iowa.
== Photographs ==
<gallery mode=packed heights=350px style="text-align:left">
File:1968 Hogan 1.jpg|From his high school yearbook
File:1968 Hogan 2.jpg|From The Daily Times on November 19, 1962
File:1968 Hogan 3.jpg|From the Quad City Times on May 18, 1971
</gallery>


== Related Articles ==
== Related Articles ==
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[[Category:Operational loss|Hogan]]
[[Category:Operational loss|Hogan]]
[[Category:Helicopter|Hogan]]
[[Category:Helicopter|Hogan]]
[[Category:Bronze Star|Hogan]]
[[Category:Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 30|Hogan]]
[[Category:Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 30|Hogan]]

Latest revision as of 13:03, 13 November 2020

John Hogan '68

Date of birth: November 11, 1945

Date of death: May 20, 1979

Age: 33

Lucky Bag

From the 1968 Lucky Bag:

1968 Hogan LB.jpg

JOHN PATRICK HOGAN

Davenport, Iowa

Jack, like most of us, came to the Academy a civilian at heart. Coming directly from Davenport, Iowa, he had a year at St. Ambrose College under his belt along with a spare tire which was a result of that highly cherished year. He adjusted well to his second freshman year here, due greatly to his easy-going likable personality.

His four years on the Severn brought many laughs to all who crossed his path, and many ideas to modernize the "Marble Monastery", most of which never got out of his room. He had a standing feud with the technical aspects of the curriculum, and though it did score a few knockdowns, it never gained a decision. Besides working hard to beef up his QPR, "Hoagie" was an intramural stalwart who hated to lose, as evidenced by his hard-hitting heavy weight football career.

Jack looks with great anticipation and relief to graduation, after which Navy air will occupy his time. He is sure to brighten many more lives as he has brightened ours on many occasions.

1968 Hogan LB.jpg

JOHN PATRICK HOGAN

Davenport, Iowa

Jack, like most of us, came to the Academy a civilian at heart. Coming directly from Davenport, Iowa, he had a year at St. Ambrose College under his belt along with a spare tire which was a result of that highly cherished year. He adjusted well to his second freshman year here, due greatly to his easy-going likable personality.

His four years on the Severn brought many laughs to all who crossed his path, and many ideas to modernize the "Marble Monastery", most of which never got out of his room. He had a standing feud with the technical aspects of the curriculum, and though it did score a few knockdowns, it never gained a decision. Besides working hard to beef up his QPR, "Hoagie" was an intramural stalwart who hated to lose, as evidenced by his hard-hitting heavy weight football career.

Jack looks with great anticipation and relief to graduation, after which Navy air will occupy his time. He is sure to brighten many more lives as he has brightened ours on many occasions.

Loss

From VHPA:

Washington Post, May 21, 1979

LONDONDERRY, N.H., May 20 (AP)--A U.S. Navy helicopter crashed "in a ball of fire" today and killed all five crew members aboard, authorities said.

Master Sgt. James Duncan of Pease Air Force in Newington said there were no survivors.

Duncan said the craft took off Sunday morning from Norfolk Naval Air Station en route to Brunswick Naval Air Station in Maine.

The dead, all Navy personnel living in the Norfolk area were Lt. Cmdr. Lynwood H. Duncan, 34, originally of Greensboro, N.C.; Lt. Cmdr. James P. Hogan, 34, of Davenport, Iowa; Lt. Paul Melotte, 31, of Funkstown, Md.; Petty Officer Second Class Michael J. Kennedy, 25, of Warminster, Pa., and Airman Apprentice Paul J. Dellas, 21, of San Jose, Calif.

The Navy H2 helicopter went down in a field near a sparsely populated residential area in the northern part of this community of about 12,000 south of Manchester.

The Londonderry fire dispatcher said the craft was "a ball of fire" after it hit the ground, but it did not endanger any homes in the area.

Note mis-identification of Jack as "James" in the article; believe this is a simple mistake.

Other Information

From researcher Kathy Franz:

John, who also went by Jack, was a 1963 graduate of Assumption High School. Monogram Club, football, wrestling. In 1962 he was a starting guard, weighing 145 lbs. As a junior, he helped renovate the third floor of the Cosgrove Building including scrubbing layers of black dirt from the vast ceiling.

He once got a D in physical education. His father wondered how an athlete could get such a mark, so he wrote Jack. Jack's reply: "Dad, in physical education they have to grade from the top to the bottom. I just happened to be picked for a D."

After high school, he played in a billiards league at the Cue and Cushion with students from Assumption High School.

John married Patricia Jo McGivern on June 15, 1968. She also graduated from Assumption High School. Men serving in the honor guard were: Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Timothy Wilson, Ens. Michael T. Gaul, Fred L. Muniz, Lewis M. Barasha, S. Patrick Marvel, Michael Danesi, Charles Bambeneck, and Theodore Naydan. John's brother Michael was an usher.

John made his first solo flight in a T-34 Mentor trainer in December 1968. He completed five months of intensive academic, military, and physical training, including one month of primary flight training with Training Squadron One at Saufley Field.

In May 1971, John received the Bronze Star for action in Vietnam. He was assigned to a helicopter combat support squadron and engaged in the resupply by air of the 7th Fleet. He also received the Distinguished Flying Cross and several other awards.

Services for John were held on May 26, 1979, at Holy Family Catholic Church, Davenport. He was survived by his wife Patricia Jo, daughter Shannon, son Kevin; parents Mr. and Mrs. John Hogan; sisters Patricia, Cathy, Colleen; and a brother Michael.

His father earned the nickname "One Round" Jack. From the Quad-City Times, March 5, 1968: "It seems that when he aspired to be a Golden Gloves boxer, he met a tough kid who taught him a lesson – keep that chin tucked in. The opponent realized in a hurry that Jack had not read the book very well. He had the hook baited. After Jack had sparred a bit, he dropped his guard. The chin was sticking out there like a lantern. A swish, a punch to the jaw, and down went Hogan. Somebody has quoted him as saying that "the end of that 10 count was the sweetest music I ever heard." P.S. Jack did not resume his boxing career."

He has a marker in Iowa.

Photographs

Related Articles

Theodore Vivilacqua '68 and Thomas West '68 were also in 13th Company.

Paul Mellott, Jr. '70 was also lost in this crash.

Jack likely overlapped with at least one of the men who served in Helicopter Attack Squadron (Light) (HA(L)) 3.


Class of 1968

John is one of 29 members of the Class of 1968 on Virtual Memorial Hall.

The "category" links below lead to lists of related Honorees; use them to explore further the service and sacrifice of alumni in Memorial Hall.