Difference between revisions of "JOHN P. LAY, LT, USN"

From USNA Virtual Memorial Hall
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|picture=1967 Lay LB.jpg
 
|picture=1967 Lay LB.jpg
 
|LBName=JOHN PAUL LAY
 
|LBName=JOHN PAUL LAY
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|LBHometown=Baton Rouge, Louisiana
 
|LBText=A native from the swamplands of Baton Rouge, La., Johnny spent a year at L.S.U. before entering the Naval Academy. The "Deacon's" natural ability with academics consistently earned him "stars." While working on two majors, Johnny always had time to bestow his knowledge on less endowed members of the Brigade. His easy-going, quiet manner, led to a constant circle of friends around him. Johnny's favorite pastime is eating. He was always the last to be excused from the table after consuming vast quantities of hamburgers and other mess hall delicacies. His outstanding personality and leadership qualities have served him well here at the Academy and should be great assets in the Fleet.  
 
|LBText=A native from the swamplands of Baton Rouge, La., Johnny spent a year at L.S.U. before entering the Naval Academy. The "Deacon's" natural ability with academics consistently earned him "stars." While working on two majors, Johnny always had time to bestow his knowledge on less endowed members of the Brigade. His easy-going, quiet manner, led to a constant circle of friends around him. Johnny's favorite pastime is eating. He was always the last to be excused from the table after consuming vast quantities of hamburgers and other mess hall delicacies. His outstanding personality and leadership qualities have served him well here at the Academy and should be great assets in the Fleet.  
 
|LBOther=He was also a member of the 1st Regiment staff (spring) and of the 3rd Battalion staff (fall).}}
 
|LBOther=He was also a member of the 1st Regiment staff (spring) and of the 3rd Battalion staff (fall).}}
  
 
== Loss ==
 
== Loss ==
From the July-August 1971 issue of SHIPMATE:
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From the July-August 1971 issue of ''Shipmate'':
 
<blockquote>
 
<blockquote>
 
Lt. John Paul Lay, USN, was killed on 17 April at sea near Cherry Point, N.C, as the result of an aircraft accident during night bombing practice under flare illumination. Funeral services were held 23 April in Broadmoor Presbyterian Church in Baton Rouge, La. Burial followed in Green Oaks Memorial Gardens.
 
Lt. John Paul Lay, USN, was killed on 17 April at sea near Cherry Point, N.C, as the result of an aircraft accident during night bombing practice under flare illumination. Funeral services were held 23 April in Broadmoor Presbyterian Church in Baton Rouge, La. Burial followed in Green Oaks Memorial Gardens.

Revision as of 11:45, 10 January 2019

John Lay '67

Date of birth: September 30, 1944

Date of death: April 17, 1971

Age: 26

Lucky Bag

From the 1967 Lucky Bag:

Loss

From the July-August 1971 issue of Shipmate:

Lt. John Paul Lay, USN, was killed on 17 April at sea near Cherry Point, N.C, as the result of an aircraft accident during night bombing practice under flare illumination. Funeral services were held 23 April in Broadmoor Presbyterian Church in Baton Rouge, La. Burial followed in Green Oaks Memorial Gardens.

The Baton Rouge native attended LSU for a year before entering the Naval Acad emy. After graduating in 1967, he attended North Carolina State University on the Immediate Master's Program. He received his advance degree in January 1968. He then attended flight school. Upon completion of that course he was assigned to VT-1 at Saufley Field.

Lt. Lay joined VT-24 later in Beeville, Tx. At the time of his death he was attached to the USS John F. Kennedy with VA-46.

Actively concerned with and involved in the affairs of his classmates and shipmates, he served as president of his class and was a Life Member of the Alumni Association.

Survivors include his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Donald Lay, 753 Lonita St., Baton Rouge, L A 70815.

He was piloting a A-7B Corsair II.


Class of 1967

John is one of 34 members of the Class of 1967 on Virtual Memorial Hall.

The "category" links below lead to lists of related Honorees; use them to explore further the service and sacrifice of the alumni in Memorial Hall.