BENJAMIN G. BARTHALOW, CDR, USN

From USNA Virtual Memorial Hall

Benjamin Barthalow '00

Date of birth: February 6, 1878

Date of death: August 18, 1920

Age: 42

Lucky Bag

From the 1900 Lucky Bag:


Loss

Benjamin died on August 18, 1920 of either the flu or cancer, or perhaps "acute indigestion." He was commanding officer of the Mare Island, California station ship at the time.

He "died in the hospital at Mare Island naval station, California." He was survived by his mother.

Benjamin is buried in Ohio.

Career

From the Military Museum:

Early in 1912, Lieutenant Benjamin G. Barthalow of the Regular Navy, was detailed as instructor for the Naval Militia of California and under his guidance regular gun crews were organized and trained. On July 6, 1912, these gun crews with as many officers and men of the Naval Militia as could be accommodated on board the "Marblehead," steamed for Bremerton and Port Angeles for target practice for the first time with large caliber guns. The target practice was done under the official inspection of Lieutenant Barthalow, United States Navy, and was officially reported by him to the Navy Department. The record established by the Naval Militia of California at this shoot was its crowning achievement, and was in fact marvelous for new men. The shooting was claimed by Adjutant General Edwin A. Forbes, to be the best ever done in the world by any gun crews of any navy at any time or place.

He was the commissioning commanding officer of USS Santa Teresa (ID 3804) in November 1918. Earlier in the year he was commanding officer of USS Lenape (ID 2700).

Benjamin was then the commissioning commanding officer of USS Smith Thompson (DD 212) from December 1919 to January 1920.

He was promoted to Commander on July 1, 1919.

A full chronology of his career was printed after his death.

Navy Cross

From Hall of Valor:

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Commander Benjamin Grady Barthalow, United States Navy, for distinguished service in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. LENAPE, engaged in the important, exacting, and hazardous duty of transporting and escorting troops and supplies through waters infested with enemy submarines and mines during World War I.

Service: Navy
Division: U.S.S. Lenape


Class of 1900

Benjamin is one of 6 members of the Class of 1900 in Memorial Hall.